Nihal Krishan

Tech Reporter

Nihal Krishan is a technology reporter for FedScoop. He came to the publication from the Washington Examiner where he was the  Big Tech Reporter and has previously covered the tech industry at Mother Jones and Global Competition Review. Besides tech policy, he has also extensively covered national politics with a focus on the economy and campaign finance. His work has been published in the Boston GlobeUSA TODAYHuffPost, and the Arizona Republic, and he’s appeared on NPR, SiriusXM, and PBS Arizona. A graduate of Arizona State University's Walter Cronkite School for Journalism, he learned to love biking and backpacking in the southwest. Nihal is a TCK who grew up in South Korea, Saudi Arabia, India, and Singapore. You can email him at nihal.krishan@fedscoop.com

Tech

White House gives federal agencies May 2023 deadline to provide list of quantum-vulnerable cryptographic systems

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Under new guidance, government departments will have to provide an annual inventory of algorithms that could be cracked by quantum computers.

Acquisition

NSA to reconsider $2.4B analyst contract after protests from Booz Allen and Leidos

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The National Security Agency will rethink a $2.4 billion contract it awarded to CACI International following protests by Booz Allen Hamilton and Leidos.

Policy

House lawmakers introduce bill to overhaul how agencies buy software

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The SAMOSA Act could significantly affect how federal agencies acquire software and IT services.

Cyber

Biden administration cyber apprenticeship sprint creates 194 new programs

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42% of cyber apprentices hired through the recruitment push are people of color.

Cyber

Google to offer Workspace as backup solution for govt entities in case they get hacked

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The new solution is intended to support agencies that are hit with a cyber breach while using a competing tech company's products.

Policy

FBI tested and almost deployed controversial Pegasus spyware: NYT 

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The FBI almost deployed a highly controversial hacking tool that could have penetrated Americans' cellphones, according to a report.

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